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07 saturday december 2019
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08 sunday december 2019

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The Krzysztofory Palace

At 35 Market Square, on the corner with Szczepanska Street, we find the Krzysztofory Palace – the 17th century result of a merging of Gothic tenement buildings. This important site is a repository of Krakowian history, art and legend; from the Fontan room (named after the ubiquitous Baltazar Fontana , some of whose sclagiola - or imitation marble - work can be seen on the first floor) to the catacombs that once legendarily contained a wizard, a devil and a monster with the body of a rooster, the tail of a worm and the eyes of a toad, this is a good place to get a sense of the big sweep of Krakowian history. At the time of the Krakow Uprising of 1846, for example, members of the National Government, led by Jan Tyssowski, were domiciled here. During the revolutionary period of 1848, the building was a meeting place for the Civic Committee, and later on for the National Committee in Krakow.

The palace also has associations with revolutionary art– the basement was used by the extraordinary theatrical director (among other things) Tadeusz Kantor as a performance space for his legendary Cricot2 ensemble. Further down still, in the dungeon, there may be the remains of the treasure once overseen by the aforementioned wizard. We cannot know for sure. What we can say is that the building does contain a permanent exhibition of the history and culture of Krakow, featuring merchant- guild memorabilia, a three dimensional model of the city’s urban development and various patriotic symbols relating to Poland’s uprisings and struggles for independence.

Other attractions nearby

Nowa Huta

Nowa Huta (‘New Steelworks’), about 10km from the centre of town, was planned as a purpose-built industrial suburb on confiscated church land. In this sense it was an attempt, started in 1949, to create a Renaissance-inspired, communist version of the ideal city, which would also have the benefit of parachuting an atheistic working class into the heart of historic, bourgeois Poland.

Podgorze

Just acrross the river from Kazimierz lies the Podgorze district, another formerly separate town with a distinctive atmosphere now incorporated into the big city. There’s plenty to see here, and a lot of history, so it’s well worth a visit. It’s now getting the full galloping gentrification and regeneration treatment, being just over the bridge from Kazimierz, so its worth seeing now, before those processes play themselves out.

Plac Mariacki

One of the most beautiful and magical little spots In the whole of Krakow, Plac Mariacki could not be more central yet still somehow manages to produce an atmosphere of unhurried calm. Essentially a courtyard, it has had its present appearance since 1802, when the Austrians closed down what had been the cemetery of St. Mary’s Parish

Parks, gardens and green spaces

Though Krakow is on the whole a dense and compact city, it’s not short of natural beauty and green spaces in which to relax (or, if you prefer, exert yourself). First and foremost is the Planty. This almost continuous strip of green, almost completely encircling the Old Town, ensures that entering or leaving the centre is always a minor event.

Krakow ZOO

Whether you’re into zoos or not, as far as they go this is a good one: pleasant, interesting and small enough to be got round without knocking yourself out, maintained to very high standards by a clearly dedicated and professional staff and situated in as beautiful a spot - in the thick of the Wolski Woods - as just about any zoo in Europe.

St. Florian's Gate & St. Florian

One of the most important architectural landmarks in the Old Town, and one of the most important Gothic towers anywhere in the country, St. Florian’s gate was once joined by a bridge to the Barbican as part of Krakow’s medieval fortification system. The original gate was built in stone before 1307, heightened in brick in the 15th century and acquired its Baroque roof around 1660 (estimates of the date vary).

Bielany

Not far from the centre of town, in the southern part of the Las Wolski forest park, lies the Camaldulensian church of Bielany, its magnificent façade rising high above the Vistula on Srebna Gora (Silver Mountain). This is the centrepiece of an extensive array of monastery buildings established in the seventeenth century by Mikolaj Wolski, Crown Marshall of Poland.

Collegium Novum

This fine and imposing Neo-Gothic building is the seat of the Jagiellonian’s Rector and houses much of the university’s administrative apparatus; as such, it is the most visible symbol of UJ’s status and significance in the life of the city. Situated rather dramatically on Planty, it was opened in 1887 following the destruction by fire of its predecessor, Jerusalem College. Its official opening served as a pretext for a symbolic patriotic demonstration, with delegations attending from all three partitioned parts of Poland.

Wawel

If Krakow is the cultural, religious and patriotic centre of Poland, then Wawel Hill, overlooking the Old Town, is its heart. No site in the country offers a richer insight into Poland’s past and national mythology.

Market Square

Entering Krakow’s superb Market Square is never less that a pleasure, and often an inspiration – even for Krakowians who do it daily. For the visitor, it’s pure gravy.

Sightseeing

Castles and cathedrals, dungeons and dragons, an extraordinary Jewish heritage, papal history, art treasures galore, an enormous (and enormously beautiful) market square and much more – Krakow’s Old Town has the lot. Not for nothing did UNESCO designate it, along with the neighbouring Wieliczka salt mine, a World Heritage site in 1978.

The Krakus Mound

Over in Podgorze you’ll find the Krakus Mound, in which according to legend the bones of Prince Krak or Krakus, legendary founder of Krakow, are interred. It was constructed in the eighth century, not long after Krak or Krakus had taken out the dragon who’d been bothering the populace.

The ''New Sukiennice'' project

Nobody needs telling by now that the cloth hall (Sukiennice) in the heart of the Market Square is an architectural and cultural beauty beyond prize. It was decided some years ago, however, that the history and beauty of the thing were not matched by its state of repair or technical facilities. And so, with help from the Norway Fund and the ‘financial mechanism’ of the EEA (European Economic Area) was born ‘project new Sukiennice’.

Slowacki Theatre

The eclectically designed Juliusz Slowacki Theatre is named after one of the three great bards and has to be one of the most opulently spectacular buildings in Krakow. Built 1891-3 to the design of Jan Zawiejski, who studied at the Technische Hochschule in Vienna, it bears more than a passing resemblance to Garnier’s Opera in Paris.

Market Square - Igor Mitoray's Giant Head sculpture

Igor Mitoray (b.1944) is a Polish-German sculptor who studied painting at the Krakow Academy of Art. He is best known for monumental, classically-derived anatomical pieces (often giant heads), many of which have been scattered across European cities and beyond as public art. He works in teracotta, bronze and marble.

Krakow mounds

Dramatic mounds - or manmade hills – are a Krakowian speciality, and one of the things that gives the city its particular visual identity and atmosphere. The local liking of these is prehistoric in origin though are now four main examples. The Krakus Mound to the north and the Wanda Mound to the south commemorate legendary figures of the eighth century.

Contact

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info@krakowhomes.com

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Welcome to KrakowHomes - family enterprise set up with an intention of bringing new quality to the short term rental business. After many years of our presence in the market we can proudly say that we succeeded in creating our homes away from homes. Our intention has always been to combine professionalism but not at the expanse of home like atmosphere and we believe we made it. The choice of holiday rentals in Krakow is extensive. What makes us special is that our furnished apartments have been visited and recommended by BBC Good Homes magazine and National Geographic magazine. When saying luxurious we do refer to truly luxurious apartments which are located in or near Krakow Old Town and can be compared with elite Krakow hotels or with amazing boutique hotels only. Why? Because apart from amazing decor and comfort they offer such things as fountains, saunas, floor embedded Jacuzzi or Zen garden under glass floor. Our luxurious old town rentals in Krakow are just a part of coherent overall approach to serve the needs of most demanding travelers. We do not limit our service to providing accommodation but also select our tour operators diligently. As a result our trips & tours are provided by those who do it with passion. No wonder, the official Tour Guide of KrakowHomes is a person who became the official tour guide of Prince Charles while in Krakow. This all is designed to make your Krakow vacation a memorable event. Rent apartment in Krakow to enjoy your Krakow holiday.

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